A look at raskolnikov mathematical evaluation of the moral dilemma

Mill clearly states, "that all desirable things are desirable either for pleasure inherent in themselves or as means to the promotion of pleasure and the prevention of pain.

Unfortunately, Mill does not make allowances for competent judges, so any practitioner of utilitarianism must come up with his own scale to measure pleasure and pain and in turn morality. Raskolnikov demonstrates the mathematical objectivity of utilitarianism, although he miscalculates somewhat in his justification of murder.

In reality, his reasoning leaves out several elements such as numerous alternatives and unforseeable consequences, which true utilitarian arguments do not take for granted. Employing the utilitarian principle, I would have to weigh each option and then decide which one has consequences at least as good as or better than any of the other options possible.

However, Raskolnikov, in his subjectivity of the situation, has not considered the likeliness of several possibilities. A utilitarian would argue that Raskolnikov has not shown the murder to be morally justifiable because Raskolnikov abstracts the situation, does not develop key variables of utilitarianism, and thus has not accurately solved the problem.

However, his reasoning is not applicable towards a utilitarian definition of "morally right". Raskolnikov might be caught in the act. He could find alternative ways to raise money fundraising, donations, etc.

So while not doing the paper might give me the most amount of immediate pleasure, the pain that I would incur upon receiving an F in my class would greatly reduce the amount of net pleasure. Raskolnikov seems to be employing utilitarianism when he justifies the murder of his landlady.

He might prove to be ineffective in helping society. A non-utilitarian would not look at moral dilemmas with the calculated objectivity that one uses when looking at a mathematical equation.

As we see in the Crime and Punishment, Raskolnikov is not a competent judge. Both alternatives would produce a greater amount of net pleasure than the single, drastic option Raskolnikov has considered.

Only in an abstracted situation as the one Raskolnikov portrays, can his simplified conclusion be considered. According to Raskolnikov, he has two available options: Mill clearly warns against using the utilitarian thought in trying to fix something as large and general as society.

To measure the given alternatives, I would have to apply the theory of value.

Raskolnikov seems to be employing utilitarianism when he justifies the murder of his landlady. Even if Raskolnikov could prove to the old woman that her death is the morally right decision according to utilitarianism, I doubt that she would go along with the plan.

In such a calculated manner, personal pain and suffering are dismissed in lieu of the emphasis placed on monetary value. A utilitarian would argue that Raskolnikov has not reached an acceptable solution because he has not accurately solved the problem. So while not doing the paper might give me the most amount of immediate pleasure, the pain that I would incur upon receiving an F in my class would greatly reduce the amount of net pleasure.

This is because the theory of value cannot measure the value of an intangible quality such as life. To a non-utilitarian a human life holds a tremendous amount of value, a value that cannot be quantified into simplistic factors and then dismissed. Raskolnikov appears to employ the fundamentals of utilitarianism by pitting the negative consequences of murdering his old landlady against the positive benefits that her money would bestow onto society.

These two principles work together and serve as criteria for whether or not a utilitarian can deem an action morally right. He could, for example, steal the money which would inflict less pain on the old woman.Raskolnikov's mathematical evaluation of the moral dilemma presented to him in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment exemplifies the empirical view of utilitarianism.

A Look at Raskolnikov Mathematical Evaluation of the Moral Dilemma PAGES 6. WORDS 1, View Full Essay. More essays like this: raskolnikov, mathematical evaluation, moral dilemma. Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin - Alfredo Alvarez, student @ Miami University.

raskolnikov, mathematical evaluation, moral dilemma. Not sure what I'd. Utilitarianism in Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov's mathematical evaluation of the moral dilemma presented to him in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment exemplifies the empirical view of utilitarianism.

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- Utilitarianism in Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov's mathematical evaluation of the moral dilemma presented to him in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment exemplifies the empirical view of utilitarianism.

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A look at raskolnikov mathematical evaluation of the moral dilemma
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